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Japan

Center for Human Rights

Kinki University/ Osaka, Japan

Abstract

The Kinki University established in 1979 the Institute of Buraku Issues Studies based on a review of discriminatory practices at the university. The Institute was established in order to enforce a system of education and research on Buraku issues in the university. One of the most serious and extensive discriminatory practices at that time was the "Buraku Lists Scandal." The "Buraku Lists" were meant to identify the location of Buraku communities and to investigate personal backgrounds of individuals. The university was found to have bought a copy of the "Buraku List." On 1 April 1986, the Center for Human Rights was established to replace the Institute and started activities as an institution of education and research on human rights at Kinki University.

The Center aims to contribute to the realization of human rights by carrying out research on discrimination at home and abroad, including Buraku discrimination, race/ethnicity, gender discrimination and disability discrimination.

Publication

Research papers on Human rights (Japanese)

Contact

Center for Human Rights - Kinki University

Address: 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 Japan

Tel:  (816) 6721-2332 (ext.2009)

Fax: (816) 6730-2632

http://ccpc01.cc.kindai.ac.jp/human/index.html#01  (Japanese version)

http://www.kindai.ac.jp/english/  (English version)

 

Institute for Human Rights Research and Education

Kwansei Gakuin University/ Hyogo, Japan

Abstract

Kwansei Gakuin University has established the Institute for Human Rights Research and Education in 1995. The Institute aims to undertake research on human rights issues; to establish and administer regular courses on human rights, and to implement awareness-raising programs and produce human rights materials.

Publication

International Encyclopedia of Human Rights - the Japanese version of a major reference book on human rights by Robert L. Maddex. Under the editorial supervision of the Institute, the book was translated by a Kwansei Gakuin University faculty team consisting of Utebi Keiji, Sawada Yukiko, Takeda Jō, Fujii Kazuo, Funaki Jo and Hosomi Kazushi, and was published in April 2007 by Akashi Shoten.

Kwansei Gakuin University Journal of Human Rights Studies.

KG Human Rights Booklet (annual) - an awareness-raising publication containing reports of the Human Rights Lectures.

Materials on Human Rights Issues (annual) - distributed to all new students.

Contact

Institute for Human Rights Research and Education, Kwansei Gakuin University

Address: 1-1-155 Uegahara Nishinomiya, Hyogo 662-8501 Japan

Tel: (81-798) 54-6720

Fax: (81-798) 54-6720

E-mail: masahi@kwansei.ac.jp

www.kwansei.ac.jp/r_human/index.jsp (Japanese version)

 

The Institute of Human Rights Studies

Kansai University/ Osaka, Japan

Abstact

The Institute of Buraku Studies (established in April 1974) was subsequently reorganised and renamed the Institute of Human Rights Studies in June 1985. This current research institute conducts research in a variety of areas dealing with the discrimination of human rights: Buraku, People with disabilities, Ethnicity and race and Gender. It is committed to establishing human rights both within and outside the university; it aims to contribute towards making people aware of human rights and to make advancements in the realm of research.

Research findings are reported in publications such as “Bulletin of the Institute of Human Rights Studies” which is circulated within Japan to related institutions. In addition, the activities and data of the institute are outlined in the “Institute of Human Rights Studies Newsletter”.

There is a collection of materials dealing with human rights issues held in the institute which can be accessed by all staff and students of the university.

Furthermore, it is our endeavor to put our research findings into use both within and outside the university campus; our university is committed to raising people's' awareness of human rights issues on a wide scale. To achieve this, public lectures are held which are open to students, teaching staff and the general public.

Contact

The Institute of Human Rights Studies - Kansai University

Address: 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita-shi, Osaka 564-8680 Japan

Tel: (816) 6368-1182

Fax: (816) 6368-0081

E-mail: jinkenken@jm.kansai-u.ac.jp; jinkenken@ml.kandai.jp

www.kansai-u.ac.jp/hrs  (Japanese version)

http://www.kansai-u.ac.jp/hrs/english/index.html (English version)

 

Institute of Global Concern (IGC)

Sophia University/ Tokyo, Japan

Abstact

The Institute of Global Concern (IGC), formerly known as the Institute for the Study of Social Justice (ISSJ, Sophia University), was founded in April 1981. The Sophia Relief Service was founded in the same year to pursue practical relief activities.

IGC aims to raise the consciousness of students and the wider society regarding the promotion of social justice. IGC has sought to apply interdisciplinary inquiries into issues of justice in today's changing world to both the education of Sophia students and its practical activities (primarily refugee assistance).

Contact

Institute of Global Concern (IGC), L-713, Main Library, Sophia University

Address: 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-8554 JAPAN

Tel: (81-3) 3238-3023

Fax (81-3) 3238-4237

E-mail: i-glocon@sophia.ac.jp

http://www.sophia.ac.jp/eng/research/research/research_Inst  (English version)

 

Research Center for Human Rights (RCHR)

Osaka City University/ Osaka, Japan  

Abstract

The Research Center for Human Rights (RCHR) is the former Dowa Mondai Research Institute of the Osaka City University, the first academic research facility for minority issues in Japan. The Institute was established in 1972 to focus on the rights of discriminated Japanese, the so-called Burakumin. It was renamed into Research Center for Human Rights to research on broader human rights issues. RCHR now covers, in addition to the issue of Burakumin discrimination, gender, ethnic, disability and other minority/human rights issues.   

Dowa Mondai (or Buraku Mondai) signifies the issues concerning a minority group unique to Japanese society. Burakumin are the people whose ancestors were relegated to an outcast status in the pre-modern era. Having no distinguishing physical or cultural traits, today Burakumin are distinguished by their residence in communities called Buraku (or Dowa districts) which were segregated in the pre-modern era, or by their ancestral background which is recorded in family registers. Burakumin continue to face discrimination and suffer from low socio-economic status.

RCHR aims to undertake research on a broad range of issues affecting the Japanese society at present, namely, Burakumin discrimination, gender, ethnic, disability and other minority/human rights issues.

Publication

The Journal of Human Rights (annual),  in Japanese.

Contact

Research Center for Human Rights (RCHR) - Osaka City University

3-3-138 Sugimoto Sumiyoshi-ku Osaka City, Osaka 558-8585 Japan

Tel: (816) 6605-2035

Fax (816) 6605-2035

E-mail: furukubo@rchr.osaka-cu.ac.jp

www.rchr.osaka-cu.ac.jp (japanese version )

http://www.rchr.osaka-cu.ac.jp/dowa-e1.html  (english version )

Last update

6/7/2015